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Haste to the Wedding, a jig, has Irish, Scottish, and English origins at least dating back to 1767 when it appears in the pantomime, The Elopement, staged in London. The first verse of the song is:

Come haste to the wedding, ye friends and ye neighbours,
The lovers their bliss can no longer delay;
Forget all your sorrows, your care, and your labours,
And let ev’ry heart beat with rapture to-day:
Ye votaries all, attend to my call,
Come revel in pleasures that never can cloy:
Come, see rural felicity,
Which love and innocence ever enjoy. [1]https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Haste_to_the_Wedding_(1)

The tune is found in America in the late 18 th century music copybooks (handwritten sheet music books) of Henry Livingston, a Major in the 3 rd New York Regiment that participated in the failed attempt to take Montreal from British control in 1775. [2]Loc. cit. It appears in Elias Howe’s publications, Musician’s Omnibus (Boston, 1850) and School of Fife (Boston, 1851), [3]Loc. cit. and was used on both sides of the American Civil War as a military quickstep (brisk music played during marching). [4]McCabe, Larry. The Magic of Appalachian Fiddling. Santorella Publications. 2005, p 6. Perhaps because of its military history, the tune became especially popular in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia in the early 20 th Century. [5]tunearch.org, Op. cit. Haste to the Wedding can be heard in Old Time Jams, Contradances, and Irish and Scottish Sessions everywhere.

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References

References
1 https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Haste_to_the_Wedding_(1)
2, 3 Loc. cit.
4 McCabe, Larry. The Magic of Appalachian Fiddling. Santorella Publications. 2005, p 6.
5 tunearch.org, Op. cit.

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